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torontobjs
04-16-2009, 04:41 PM
Hey!
I'm new here and I just need some tips if anybody wouldn't mind! I don't have the money for Deluxe training, and since the 14th I've been playing and training (on regular training) my team. I'm currently 4-1.. but I feel like that means nothing somehow. I've been reading some posts and you guys are really intimidating with your efficient training schedules and everything.. Are there any tips anybody can give me for a noob who doesn't have deluxe? How can I improve my team?
Oh and by the way.. GO JAYS GO!!! WOO 7-3!!!

Team: Toronto Blue Jays (TBJ)
ID#: 617323

NYYankeesFan
04-16-2009, 04:43 PM
You can also go here: http://smallball.org/showthread.php?t=6977

Also welcome to the forum

Roughnecks
04-16-2009, 04:44 PM
http://www.smallball.org/showthread.php?t=8746

Also read this one too.

epiphanic
04-16-2009, 05:20 PM
First, keep reading the forums. Learn about the different theories and opinions about the game.

Second, train how you want to train. Whether you use a set schedule or train by feel, just do what ever makes sense to you. If you learn something later that 'causes you to change how you think about the game, don't be afraid to change how you train.

Third, keep things simple. ST training is only as difficult as you make it.

bobjones83
04-16-2009, 05:22 PM
I think to add to everything above is as a ST team take advantage of DT Friday when you can use the DT trainer for free.

Lazarus
04-16-2009, 05:58 PM
Here is the latest, and likely final version of my USTG

http://smallball.info/ustg.html

Updated quite a bit from the original that was linked above.


****** EDITED ******

Now that I have some free time, heres a few extra tips.

First, take passive training off. Thats going to cause more harm than good, esp with your team being so new. You'll need to save up your TP and with passive on its going to be hard to do if someone plays you often.

Second, take at least some time to find your pitchers. Some guys have VERY long drawn out routines for this, and some do it in a matter of days. Either way you really do need to at least take some time to try and figure your pitchers out. It'll save time in the future.

Third, with reference to schedules posted elsewhere, etc.. Take all that with a gain of salt. I am a firm believer in every team being different in ways (if only very slightly) What works for one team may not work at all for yours. Experiment with your guys and see how they react to different training techniques. Find one that you can live with, and your team responds well to.

Fourth, and to me most importantly. Remember its just a game. Some guys around here take things way too seriously (naming no names) some guys have books full of data on their teams. Which is fine, if you enjoy doing that kind of stuff. However, for most of us advanced "record keeping" would be well over the top. This game can be VERY enjoyable, but its only as enjoyable as you'll let it be.

Fifth, Keep asking questions. Some people will spout off about how "The search button is your friend" and the such. Well, yes the search feature CAN BE wonderful, but consider this. Say six months ago I made a post on how I think you should find your pitchers. However, in that time I have changed my mind quite a deal and now no longer believe in the method I posted before.. See what I mean? Don't be afraid to ask questions. People change their opinions around here as much as they do their clothes (and more often in some people's cases)

=)

GodofAcid
04-17-2009, 09:24 AM
If you want to compete with the big boys, you have to find your pitchers. If you're a casual player, you can have fun without doing that. You can always do it down the road. It's a tedious process, however, so be prepared. Also, your team is going to be terrible at the start, just like the others you'll be playing. Games won't look very realistic. This changes once your team gets better. The best teams are complete teams. Focusing on one skill forever isn't the way to go, you need to eventually broaden your skills and make sure you have some of everything.

jimmygfat
04-17-2009, 11:23 AM
I wish you well in your training torontobjs. Donít get too high over 5* blow out victories and donít get too low on some bad 8* beat downs. Smallball for serious Pro League players is a life style. Training is just part of your everyday routine. Just to contrast, some trainers will study and compute training gains and losses like a NASA engineer, while others will set back and never pay attention to gains and use pitchers that were just randomly picked and never really tested. Both training styles have worked in Smallball.
Get a schedule that works for your life, donít over do it and have fun. Good Luck

yungcurtis
04-17-2009, 01:43 PM
First, keep reading the forums. Learn about the different theories and opinions about the game.

Second, train how you want to train. Whether you use a set schedule or train by feel, just do what ever makes sense to you. If you learn something later that 'causes you to change how you think about the game, don't be afraid to change how you train.

Third, keep things simple. ST training is only as difficult as you make it.

Reading is fundamental, become friends w/ the search bar and make sure before you ask a question that someone before you hasn't asked the same thing and some knowledge has been shared on the topic already.

GarbadgeMan
04-17-2009, 11:33 PM
A fellow Jays fan! Good to hear!

Here's my advise. Don't take anything anyone says to you as a neccesity. You're going to hear a lot of things about finding your pitchers and focusing on your defensive aspects and making sure you have this and that. Ideally, you want to put together the kind of team you will have the most fun with. If you like the long ball, train a team that will hit a lot of home runs, if you like defensive battles, train a team that can play defensively. Regardless of what style of play you want to approach with, you can build a winning team.

Also don't get intimidated by how hardcore some of these guys get. There are a lot of tainers who put hours and hours into figuring out how they're going to train and still suck, and there are a lot of trainers who put in no effort and still win. A large portion of this game has to do with the luck of the draw (aka some teams are naturally just better than others in certain things). A lot of players have gotten by just training to get rid of their pie and then moving on. Just because you don't schedule everything, doesn't mean you're gunna do poorly.

When it comes down to it, a lot of guys here can give you a LOT of great advise, some that conflicts others. Don't read tips like they're coming from some smallball bible, pick and chose things that you like the sound of and mix it in with your own methods. I train my own way, I don't know if my approach is considered smart around here, but it has worked for me in the past, so I don't really care if it's stupid :P Just have fun, train your way. If you get into a slump, there are a ton of different trainers on here with different methods which, in my opinion, are good in moderation.

Welcome to Smallball!

torontobjs
04-18-2009, 01:02 PM
Wow. Thank you all for the great advice. Everyone's awesome on these forums. Keep giving the great advice! I appreciate every piece of it!

redbirds33
04-18-2009, 02:04 PM
Get to know each of your players individually. Every player gains and loses different skills at different rates. Pretty much everything in this game revolves around that concept.